Log #15: A Book Review on Cruelty

In the past few weeks I have been reading some interesting books. The titles are Lord of the Flies by William Golding and The Wednesday Wars by Gary D. Schmidt.  I decided to write about these books because they left a big impression on me.  Even though the books don’t directly talk about it, each of these unique novels present a picture of reality where in the world is truly unfair.

 

The Lord of the Flies takes place in the Pacific Ocean during the second World War.  This 432526-lord-of-the-flies-piggy-death-scenenovel is about a group of boys stranded on an island trying to survive.  In the story of The Lord of the Flies, the boys become savages controlled by an evil force that they think is on the island with them.  But they were so wrong.  The evil force they feared is in all of us.  It is the evil within.  It feeds off of a hunger for power.  In the book, all of the boys had a chance to work together, but the pursuit of power turned them into savages.  

 

This book had many impactful scenes.  The scene that left the most impact on me was when Simon had a hallucination.  This critical scene takes place in front of a pig’s head.  The boys who had turned into savages left this pig’s head as a sacrifice for the “beast” they think is on the island.  This is the moment when Simon talks to the pig head which is a symbol for the “Lord of the Flies”.  In his hallucination Simon realizes that the real “Lord of the Flies” is the evil that lurks within everyone.  He is soon violently murdered by the boy savages.  This made me furious because he understood everything, but it didn’t matter.  Even if you know things, the world is still injust.  

 

I also noticed a similar problem when I read the Wednesday Wars.  These books are in different time periods, but there is still the same problem of injustice. I noticed that people’s values are very different to people’s today.  The main character Holling, who is seventh grade, had a dad who didn’t care about his family and only cared about his business.  He kept pushing Holling to inherit it and that is what his life will be.  Holling’s sister however never got any respect.  Her father said she can’t go to college, and she will 556136work for him.  Holling’s sister went to California to find herself against her father’s will, and her dad pronounced that she isn’t his daughter and he should not help her.  If Holling hadn’t sent her money, she would have been stuck in California with no place to stay and no money.  This novel made me see that even though women are strong and good people, they were treated unfairly throughout history.  

 

Cruelty is like a permanent stain on humankind.  By reading these books I learned that it doesn’t matter if you are a man or a woman or a boy or a girl of any race, you can still be cruel and people can be cruel to you.  The human race can change, but it will take more than a hunger for power to help us.

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One thought on “Log #15: A Book Review on Cruelty

  1. Unfortunately, injustice is part of our world (this real world, not our networked Arganee), and dealing with it through literature is an important act of coming to terms with it, dealing with it and finding a path forward. I hope to read more of your reviews this summer. I just finished a very interesting book — The Murderer’s Ape — that may or may not intrigue you, if you like a slow-rolling mystery (told by the narrator, an ape named Sally Jones).
    Your NetNarr friend from the wide open,
    Kevin

    Like

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